About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
CNBC 21
FBC 18
CNNW 5
KQED (PBS) 5
MSNBC 5
MSNBCW 5
KQEH (PBS) 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
CNN 2
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 2
WETA 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
KBCW (CW) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 81
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
place to be once they settle this thing. the third and the most important thing is the u.s. economy is the most vibrant, adaptable, innovative and creative economy on the planet. i think that means we're coming out and starting to see that in many sectors today. we're bullish and think you need to look at this on a positive frame. >> maria, i'm less bullish than that. that sounds very optimistic. i would love to believe that, but if you compare valuations of equities versus bonds, yes, there's a huge spread right now, but that doesn't necessarily make equities really cheap. it's just a relative trade. i think, also, yes, we're a vibrant economy. we certainly are a strong economy. i think it's really unsustainable, the level of debt that we have in this country. we have $1 trillion in debt. i heard an incredibly succinct way of describing this. rick santelli actually said it this morning about how you can't say you're cutting $800 billion when really $80 billion is really from wars that are just going away. that's not really a cut. that's taking away the addition. i think you need to
the economy. the central bank is widely expected to announce an extension of its bond buying program when it meets next week. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: with the fiscal cliff about three weeks away, washington hasn't made much progress to avoid it. that was the assessment from one of those directly involved: house speaker john boehner. the top republican today accused president obama of, "slow walking", the economy to the edge of the cliff. he repeated his call for the president to send congress a plan that can pass both houses of congress. tax rates are the major sticking point. the president wants to raise them for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal
materials and technology lad a bit. the u.s. economy added 146,000 jobs in november as the unemployment rate dropped to four year low of 7.7%. today's report may not be as strong as it seemed, reporting employers added 49,000 fewer jobs in september and october than initially estimated. a preliminary reading showing consumer confidence plunging to its lowest level in four months. early december americans prepare for a potentially higher taxes at the beginning of next year. the index dropping 74.5 this month, far below november's reading of 82.7 and economists forecasts of 82.4. >> in the pits of the cme, michael tells us why dividend paying stocks are taught play regardless of next year's tax rate and charlie will share why he is bullish despite short-term volatility but let's start with phil at the cme. the dow did well today. better than expected, arguably better than expected, jobs report boosting the markets but we got consumer confidence and the fiscal cliffhanging over everything. what did you make of the markets today? >> i was disappointed we failed on that rally and shot up 1421 and
implementations for the economy. cheryl: i can hear the hesitancy in your voice. a lot of our guests are saying the same thing. they are afraid of what washington will do or maybe not do. your outlook is a bit more bullish than some of your colleagues. what are you saying in the second half of 2013 that others are not? >> on a very short-term basis, we have noticed there are a couple of things. the fiscal cliff. we cannot get out of the way of that. if you look at to the second half of 2013 that we can get some resolution, we may not like the total resolution, but if we can, you move past a period of uncertainty. three things have started in 2012 that could accelerate in 2013. housing is key. cheryl: it has done incredibly well this year. >> the second aspect is what is going on with the energy field, in terms of technology and energy less dependence for the u.s. the third factor is what is going on in manufacturing. you can talk about the creation of jobs in the u.s. economy. if you can get the u.s. economy past this model through environment, you will see a slight acceleration in the second h
with the german economy and this is a big divergence. so that's a change. but looking over time, all stocks have the component of what they call the economic return. speculative return which is it for change and the valuation that the market puts on it. over time, one is a possum gain and the other is zero sum gain. sometimes good news, sometimes bad news. but over time the kind of net being nothing. >> we'll see what happens. good to have you on. we'll be out in westminster, joined by the british shadow business secretarier to. we'll talk currencies. find out why one strategist is bullish on the currency. after the ramp up in m&a that we've seen this year, we'll also speak to an expert in los angeles that says the fundamentalses for deal activity in 2013 are looking more solid. so where will the money flow in the new year, that's at 11:20. and the outlook for u.s. credit market appears less rose city. we'll speak to a moody's analyst that says high duration credit could be badly exposed. the european central bank is announcing either monetary policy decisions later today. economists expect ecb
the economy avoid the cliff and rides above? anyway, senior u.s. economist and managing director at ubs. do you think we'll get a deal? >> i think we'll get a deal. do we get it before the holidays or after for markets, it matters. it's been a drag for the last nine months. so the idea that there is more uncertainty now than there was six months ago, how does that work? there was no fiscal cliff deal six months from now and still no deal. so i'm not sure why we think there's more uncertainty. i would say if you really think about it the president has a lot of ways to delay the impact. for example, our withholding table don't have to get change order january 1. even if you haven't struck a deal, you don't adjust the withholding tables. for now you can delay the pain. so there is wiggle room in terms of when the impact has to be felt. >> but is there where wiggle rom the investing world who looks at the united states and says these guys are a bunch of keystone cops. this cost us with the last round of negotiations back in the summer of 2011 when the debt rating agencies said if you can't find
of the year. we have so much uncertainty in washington. we do have slowing economies in europe and in the u.s. >> right. david, what do you say right now? break the tie for us. >> break the tie. in the near term, there's an epic tug of war between extremely aggressive monetary easing and just total disdain for what they're doing in washington on tax and regulatory policy. in the near term, the fiscal cliff prevails. in the longer term, the fed will prevail. there's so much mistrust on stocks that i think that still can be a positive catalyst for stocks relative to traditional bonds over the next 12 months. >> i'm going to push back a little bit on that. >> i'm going to break the tie in ralph's favor. >> david, i want to push back a little bit on that. in terms of -- like, is the fed really that much of a factor these days now in terms of keeping the market afloat? >> absolutely. >> it's not losing its bang for its buck? >> it's not as powerful as it was in the fall of 2008 or even 2010, but when you consider that, u.s., long bonds, 1.5%. short-term interest rates, zero. negative on an infla
minutes away. count do countdown is on. the economy probably added about 80,000 jobs last month. reuters consensus is a little higher at 93,000. the unemployment rate expected to hold steady at 7.9% and economists say the slow down in nonfarm payrolls will reflect the effect of sandy. joining us this hour is bank of america merrill lynch global research senior research economist michelle mire and we'll talk through everything that's been happening through jobs and what to expect. but first, there is a developing story. an earthquake off the northeast coast of japan triggered a tsunami warning. the warning has been lifted, but it was a 7.3 quake. so far no reports of any injuries or damage. it was for the same area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami back in march of last year. we will continue to bring you any developments. in the meantime, steve has some of the morning's top other stories. >> let's start with the markets. asian stocks rallying to 2012 highs overnight. the nikkei edging lower after hitting a se hitting hitting a seven month closing high yesterday. european trading, s
to get better. the economy is strong. it's going to get stronger. >> what evidence do you have these guys are not just going to go over the fiscal cliff? we heard tim geithner on this program yesterday when steve asked him, look f you don't get what you want, do we go over the fiscal cliff? he said absolutely. >> he said he would do it! >> what happens when we wake up january nd, we go over the cliff, and the world doesn't end? >> that is so irresponsible. >> you have to be a long-term investor. long-term stocks have outperformed bonds. >> with all do respect, george, are you one of those come play september investors larry is referring to? >> i'd say we're opposite of that. we never take anything for granted, but we bet accordingac. bonds are trouble. a lot of people are going to lose a lot of money in bonds. you have to be prepared for that. interest rates are going to go up. dividends are going to continue to increase. the economy in this country is strong. it's going to get stronger. >> even at 44% dividend tax? >> it's not going to go that high. >> if we go over the fiscal cliff, it
until our economy falls off the tax and fiscal cliff. just where do we stand on a deal coming out of washington, d.c.? cnbc correspondent joins us with all the details. >> reporter: as you know the white house's strategy since the election has been to break republican resistance on two issues. one is tax rates and one is an increase in the debt limit. he hasn't succeeded or budged off that attempt so far which is why john boehner came out in a news conference today and slammed the white house for not being willing to compromise. >> four days ago we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there's been no counter offer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk or economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> a few hours later you had a slight indication of flexibility from the administration. vice president joe biden was out. he reiterated those two nonnegotiable demands on the part of the administration but said the actual amount of that top rat
. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow-walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: not surprisingly, democratic house leader nancy pelosi had precisely the opposite explanation for what is behind this stalemate. she says republicans simply echoing the white house are going to have to buckle on the issue of the top rates. >> the only obstacle standing in the way of middle income tax relief are the republicans unwillingness to ask the top 2% to pay their fair share. >> but tyler, as you suggested, this is all a work in progress. the thing we cannot see that is not visible to the public or to the press is what's going on behind the scenes. staff discussions resumed yesterday. don't know how fruitful. i haven't gotten much of a signal from people on either side that a deal is close, but they're work rg at it and sometimes these situations can turn around quickly. >> john, what of the reports today that perhaps at some point the republicans in the house and in the senate would go along with the idea of extending the bus
and of course the economy next year, i think the dollar is going to drift a little bit weaker. nothing dramatic, but i think it will drift a little weaker as the year progresses. > thanks tim. have a good trading day. > > thanks. just in time for the holidays, hostess brands' layoff of more than 18,000 employees is part of a bulge in end-of-the-year layoffs this year. job cuts are up for the third straight month, and our cover story looks at whether this is a trend that may continue in the new year. job cuts nationwide were up for the third consecutive month in november. november would have been lower, but hostess brands' 18,500 layoffs as a part of bankruptcy pushed the number higher. "it's not a reflection of the strength of the economy as a whole." since january, the number of announced layoffs is actually 13% lower than it was in 2011. that's despite a dreadful january and february that saw more than 50,000 layoffs at american airlines, pepsico, j.c. penney, metlife and procter and gamble. "those are very specific company-based layoffs. they're not even sector-based." hostess brands is cont
savings as part of that and invest in things that matter to the american economy. we think we can do that. we have a good chance to do it now. it's important that we do it. i think we're going to get there. >> given tough talk over the weekend, why aren't we waking up to down numbers, red arrows? >> europe is terrific. bond rates are phenomenal. a great run. china numbers are better. i think that there's a lot of people who feel like doug cast does who writes with me with a piece in "the new york times" saying that -- >> most stuff is nontaxable accounts any way. most stocks that people won't be as motivated to sell as people think. of course that doesn't necessarily deal with the increase in payroll taxes and the whole recession side of it. it does deal with the stock market side in terms of selling. >> why not say, listen, fiscal cliff, i have to cut numbers. i have to cut guidance. i think many ceos will cut guidance because of the possibility that the amt is going to -- this alternative minimum tax, people don't know they have to write a check for $3,500 at the end of the year. once y
two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with this big deal. as i've been telling you we'll see a lot of big deals -- i was wrong. here we are. freeport mcmoran buying not one but two companies. the combined price if you add it all together gets close to $20 billion. that does include debt. let's go through some of the details. it's somewhat complex. let's start with bigger of the two deals. freeport's purchase of plains. approximately $6.9 billion in total now. it's a cash and stock deal. .6531 shares and 39 bucks a share in cash. that adds up to $50
on the obama administration if the economy doesn't recover. >> all right. many thanks, scott rasmussen, appreciate it very much. >> thanks. >>> with just 26 days until we fall off the tax and fiscal cliff, two dozen house republicans have apparently defected from the boehner plan and signed a bipartisan letter with democrats. people are now asking is there a fallback position for the gop? well, here now to tell us is house majority whip california republican kevin mccarthy, the number three man. mr. mccarthy, as always, thank you for coming back on the show. can i get your comment on this letter, two dozen republicans, they're talking about tax rate flexibility along with a bunch of democrats. what's your take, sir? >> well, remember what they're saying here. what they're saying is that they're going to put everything on to the table. what we've been talking about for so long is where the president has been awol, this is a spending issue that we have a real problem with. we agree that we'll provide revenue, but we do not want to hurt a pro growth economy here. so it's how you go about
stop the generation of jobs in this economy. >> there's a great article today in one of the papers about how apartment building, we have a shortage of apartments and shortage of housing and shortage of autos and shortage of office buildings developing, shortage of shopping centers, shortage of shopping malls. this is what begins a movement. you have to hire eventually. now you could say people are not looking for work, come on. look, jobs are here. they can -- it can be just easily reversed if you have no idea what is the future because of washington. >> given the data points that we've had in terms of claims numbers that did reflect an impact from sandy, they said 85,000 jobs or 86,000 jobs were sliced because of impact of sandy. average hours worked unchanged. doesn't that -- i don't know -- doesn't that bring into question a little bit the participation in the survey. how can it have no impact whatsoever? it seems curious to me. >> it does call into question whether these numbers can be accurate. we have been starting to think let's check accuracy. why isn't this done by s.a.p.?
back then, barack obama believed that lowering rates was good for the economy. dagen and connell, it is yours. connell: the war on wealth is where we begin today. dagen: get the government out of the markets. connell: the devil wears -- becoming our next ambassador to britain. dagen: holiday travelers paying up. the average ticket price topping $450. connell: everyone needs a few days off. it is the top of the hour. we will go to nicole petallides. good morning. nicole: good morning. let's take a look at what is going on here. let's take a look at jardin restaurants. it turns out they are not meeting the analyst expectations. let's take a look at the stock. it is near its lows of he day. their earnings will miss the analyst estimates. same-store sales dropping 3.2%. as a result, sales have diminished. how about the major market averages? the dow is higher, but the s&p and the nasdaq are lower. dagen: republicans finally pulling off their own plan to deal with the fiscal cliff. connell: the white house predictably saying, no deal. the parameters are there now. we can start to ima
show again. >> great to be with you, thank you. gerri: everything's hanging in the banse, economy, middle class income, taxes, you name it, and you and your fellow house members are not going to work. >> well, wait, this is a 24-hour day job, seven days a week. i'm in new york tomorrow looking at the hospitals affected in hurricane sandy, and i feel like i need to do the ground work to investigate that for myself. gerri: you're doing work, but not all the people you work with in washington are. some are just taking time off before the holidays when this big issue is on the plate. nancy pelosi had to say about this. >> we should be here and came as a surprise, and i'm really surprised that the republicans would leave. we maim in tuesday, and we left wednesday at twelve o'clock noon. with all that needs to be done, avoiding the conversation, sounds like people don't want to be in town for some reason. gerri: does she have a right -- are the republicans trying to avoid the conversation? >> no, absolutely not. we had a hearing this morning in the joint economic committee on this issue
republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get of the most widely owned stocks sees heavy trading. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not ique to citi; it's indtry- wide. a financial
. it really helps the economy. gerri: or something surprising here. we have a comparison, brightwork state versus nonwhite work state. we just showed weight increases by higher then any nonwhite work state. how is that possible? >> what it does is a big open for business sign to attract businesses to the state. lawmakers in the state are putting workers and job creators about special interests. and they know that they won't have to -- that the politicians won't be putting anyone else ahead of the jobs. gerri: job growth shrinking in the united states. it really does involve michigan. it's what happened with detroit auto workers. their jobs shrinking. they're definitely on the decline. other workers in the south. and there is a clear case study of the power of the work states -- the right to work states. not for those who employ people come up before the workers. >> that is right. the auto industry -- the american auto industry is actually coming back. but it's coming back in the right to work states where we have the very stringent right to work state. all the auto workers are making more
back this morning, a new report finds that exporting nat gas will actually help the u.s. economy, but not every day is a winner. >>> vice chairman alan blinder will tell us what he thinks. >>> a new study from the federal government shows exporting u.s. natural gas overseas has the potential to reshape the global energy markets. the obama administration has said the study will be central to the decision on whether to export. he said exporting the gas would be a bigger impact on the economy. >> slap in the face of dow chemical. of coke, not coke the beverage company. but this was something that was hotly disputed within the romney campaign. he really let this stuff go because the romney campaign had some very big givers that were chemical companies. >> do we know, say, very bad, how much will prices conceivableably go up if we become an exporter of natural gas? is it that great a difference? >> we burn offer more natural gas than we use. burn off, in other words literally, you see those flames, we flare more than we use. so we got a real excess of this stuff. >> the government say
cliff? are you expecting the economy to go over the fiscal cliff and see these taxes go high hadder and spending cuts take effect? >> my personal view is i'm still optimistic. i think the conversation has been constructive since. do we have a solution on the table yet? no. but i'm optimistic we'll get to a framework. >> why? >> there's been enough dialogue. there's been movement. everyone seems to recognize the problem. everybody realizes there has to be a revenue component, spend component, entitlement reform component. for us, the business community and all the ceos, certainty is the greatest stimulus for us. >> do you support tax rates going higher? >> me personally, as an individual, more importantly the business community, which i'm part of. we support something inclusive. if rates were higher in a videocasset vacuum, i'm not sure we'd be supportive of that. we have to make sure the consumers, those who spends a lot of the dollars, the middle class, are protected in this exercise. >> i guess the question i'm really getting at is, do you get the revenue from tax increases or fro
no plan. >> austin, it's clear from this jobs report the economy is stuck in second gear. what's it going to take to get to a higher gear right now, do you think? >> i think we got to get the growth rate up in the economy. certainly europe's not any help. what's happening in china and japan is not any help. then you add on top of it what's coming out of washington. i don't think you should get your hopes up about figuring it out before the end of this year. i think there's a pretty deept chance we go over the cliff and then try to sort it out in the beginning of the year. >> lovely. >> joe, when did 146,000 jobs become good? have we become so pessimistic -- have our expectations come so low we're cheering 146,000 when we should be well over 200? >> plus the downward revisions for the previous two months. >> although, those revisions were almost all in government. mandy makes a good point. 150,000 a month, which has been the average over the past is a months or so, is not great. if this was a normal recovery, we'd be growing at 4% instead of 2 on gdp. employment would be well over 250. how
is the weakest part in the job market. but the economy's added some 3 1/2 million, 4 million jobs and that is a recovery. it's not as fast as the reagan recovery. it's faster than the push recovery and it's factored somewhere in there. >> i never thought i'd hear you say-- >> a starting point clearly was-- >> all right, i take your point. it's good stuff. i never thought i'd hear you say it's not as fast as the reagan recovery, but you just said it. >> i say that every time whenever you bring it up, that's one of the great recoveries in u.s. history. it helps when you can go straight back and doing what you were doing. stuart: if only we had done in 2009 what ronald reagan did in 1982, but i'm out of time. you know i'm out of time, now that. >> which is set the highest rate at 50%? >> no. >> that's what it was. stuart: it stimulates the private sector, not all government all the time. that's the story. aw austan, i'm sorry, i really am out of time. thank you, sir. more "varney & company" in a moment. >> a strong earthquake hit the coast of japan in the same region where the fukus
of popping off of the fha. if you look at where we stand right now, as an economy, we have a very modest recovery. it is most likely going to happen. connell: the significance of it is, in your mind, what? >> what needs to happen is we need to take note that we are subsidizing the fha again. while the fha is great for lower income borrowers, we are still allowing people to buy properties where they want after they post on the property, they are upside down on our property. that is where we need to be cautious. connell: we talk about it all the time, the housing numbers that are showing improvement. if people are only putting down, you know, the 3.5%, are we getting ourselves into a similar hole to the ones we are trying to dig ourseeves out of? >> unfortunately, we may have. the loans that the fha have increased in the past ten years, has increased tenfold. when you look at that type of fan increase in the increased exposure for the fha, there are years were barely fha loans were written. today it is a very big percentage of the market. we need to prophet fha up short term and then refor
, not on any new or widespread weakness in the economy. >> i would expect that by december, we're going to see some bounce back. much of the disruption from sandy was people simply not being able to get to work or firms not employing people that they ordinarily would have. >> reporter: friday, the government will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were
, that is a really crummy solution and how the market i and the economy reactso that? >> i agree with you, and only be a short-term solution before going off the cliff. melissa: does not achieve anything real. except avoiding going off the cliff. i made it clear that was the sole purpose of it, say okay, show us what you're really going to do. again, have attacked both sides of the budget. right now they are not even have having meaningful discussions on that. i'm suffering from fiscal cliff fatigue i think it will get worse because the end of the year is approaching. melissa: thank you for coming on. lori: way to bring it home. spending cuts, looking at even more spending or the possibility of that. housing secretary donovan branding how he hopes to avoid a government bailout for the fha. it seems like more dollar signs out there to me, peter. >> that is right. the housing secretary cannot rule it out. washington is certainly closer to one after the latest audit of the fha fund has a capital reserve shortfall of $16.3 billion. the administration says it is too soon to say whether the fha will need
not interfere with the economy the way it was beginning to. oil stepped back about one and three-quarters percent today closing at $86.38. liz: the ecb cutting at least the rate forecast of growth and so, nonetheless, that didn't help the picture, but the tech sector rallying today. as we mentioned, apple helping to push the rebounded after yesterday's steep drop. it hit a four-year low yesterday. let's look at iyw, apple makes up more than 22% of this etf which also holds tech heavyweights ibm and microsoft, three-quarters of a percent gain, and then the tech etf xlk also rose today. the fund's very large holding is, of course, apple. >>> we've got two ceos coming up that you are going to want to listen to. tom is the ceo of tmx group. it owns and operates the toronto stock exchange to our neighbors in the north, here in studio talking about the changing landscape for exchanges. the possibility of more acquisitions to come. david: and we're also going to be talking with the ceo and president of choice hotels, this is steve joyce. steve is going to be talking about their expansio
're going to talk about the fiscal cliff, we're going to talk about the global economy. we're going to talk about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medica
the economy is going to be hurt and i think both sides, especially the president deserve blame. stuart: who will get the blame? >> the republicans clearly are going to get the blame and hurting themselves. stuart: but we may go into a much slower economy and hurts the president. >> bad news for the president and even worse news for the the american people. stuart: i agree with that. all right, doug, not bad the at all. >> still a democrat. stuart: is that a tag line to every interview? >> it may well be. doug, thanks very much indeed. >> the so the president has made it very, very clear, drawn a line, no fiscal cliff deal without higher tax rates for the highest earningers, tax rates have got to go up. question, what will speaker boehner have to say about that? his reaction will be new at ten this morning. mark stein is going to be here as well and he'll join us to explore that and more. we have an oil and mining deal to tell, but. freeport mcmoran and copper and gold will have exploration and two separate deals for 9 billion in cash and stock. i'm not quite sure what all of that means. jus
. the u.s. economy added 111,000 private sector jobs according to adp. a bit weaker than expected. because of impacts from hurricane sandy. the bank saying it is looking for ways to cut expenses. those cuts amount to 4% of the companies workforce and is estimated to save $1.1 billion every year. stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole petallides. nicole: we are looking at a market that is to the downside. let's take a look at citigroup. it is about 4% of the workforce. citigroup is higher. it has had an up arrow throughout the day today. we saw the dow jones industrials this week to the downside. we had two consecutive days in selling. down arrows for the nasdaq. down 1.1%. connell: breaking news out of washington. earlier, speaker boehner speaking about the fiscal cliff. now it is president obama. let's listen. >> we have emerged not yet where we need to be, but we certainly have made progress. the reason we have made progress in part is because of the outstanding management and productivity and gains and efficiencies that you have been able to achieve in each and every one of your compan
is having on our economy, even before the end of the year, the labor department will release its november jobs report this morning. many economists believe fewer than 100,000 new jobs were created this month. that may be because companies are waiting to hire more companies until after the financial crisis is resolved. superstorm sandy likely had an impact on the unemployment rate economisted expect the unemployment rate to remain at 7.9%. >>> president obama says this northern virginia couple is proof that lawmakers must come to an agreement on a budget deal by the end of the year. he met with tiffany and richard santana yesterday. living with tiffany's parents to help make ends meet. she wrote about her struggles to the white house as part of a social media campaign. >> we live with an extended family. we have two sets of adult incomes in our home. it would be more like a $4,000 tax increase for us, which would be relatively devastating for our family. i wanted to share that with the white house. i wasn't sure i was going to get a response, but i did want to at least make my voice heard.
if there is a deal we're talking about an economy that is going to have to deal with people having higher taxes and dealing with spending cuts. what are you projecting for what are you projecting qlu ha, for economic growth and unemployment. >> sure. i think the economy going to be facing some fiscal drag from the federal side but if it is phased in slowly, it's not really use ter and abrupt i think it can handle it because i think the private sector is healing and i'm looking for improvement in growth for the second half of the year provided that we don't hit a landmine here on the fiscal side. >> all right, josh, thanks some of. we've been speaking with josh feinman of db advisor. >> tom: nearly a month and a half after super-storm sandy wreaked havoc along the new jersey shore, president obama met today with governor chris christie at the white house. the topic-- federal aid for storm recovery. the president is expected to ask congress for about $50 billion in additional emergency assistance. ruben ramirez is in seaside heights, new jersey, where business owners are striving to recover. rub
's not a threat. she said, listen, these are the facts. >> nice little economy you have there. nice little economy you have there. it would be a shame it if anything happened to it. that's not a threat. look, we have to start looking at what happens if we do, in fact, go over the so-called cliff, and what happens is, you know, one thing is we take a huge bite out of the deficit. we do it in a crude may, and there would be immediate attempts to fix it and fine-tune it and take some back. some would probably get through. if you actually want to look at it from a policy standpoint, it may not be the worst possible option to just go over the cliff and then put back in the tax cuts and the spending increases or renewals that you'd like to put back in. so, you know, worst things could happen. >> well, listen, alan simpson and i go back to his sound from the "today" show, eugene. he said anyone talking about it in that way, there's stupidity involved. he didn't say, eugene, you better not because you're my buddy, but the reality is even our first read team says this notion or all of this media hype about
nutritionally unfit to learn. the point about the economy, this is the short-sighted thinking so many people have about government expenditures, there is absolutely government waste, fraud, abuse, but when it comes to programs like this, you actually get a long-term and immediate benefit from that expenditure of taxpayer dollars. >> nobody can tell me this is a wasteful amount of food for an american. >> if i was on food stamps or s.n.a.p. program and i used my money, that dollar that i spend on my food actually comes -- recycles through the economy and produces $1.70 or more of a benefit to our gdp because you know what, people produce this food. the truckers depend on that. the store owners. it actually creates jobs in communities have millions of dollars of money that people are expending. >> what do you think about this, though, because there's another staggering statistic that 40% of all food supply in america each year is thrown away, discarded by americans, which works out to equivalent of $2,275 annually in food. it's a staggering amount of food tossed away. there is a real disconnec
. we're going to talk about the fiscal cliff. if we go over it, will it really destroy the u.s. economy? we'll show you some stats to make you go -- hmm. we'll talk more about apple's slide, should microsoft's ceo steve ballmer get the boot if the surface fails. and we will introduce to you quite possibly the world's dumbest demolition crew. it involves a multi-million dollar bore chateau and really bad bulldozing. >> yikes. see you at 1:00, brian. thank you. >>> listen up wall street recruiters, a recent rash of college cheating scandals has shown academic dishonesty is unfortunately a very big problem on campus today. who are the worst offenders? tonight's premier of "faking the grade -- classroom cheaters," we'll tell you. they'll find out which students are most likely to cut corners in the battle to gain an edge. >> reporter: don mccabe and his canadian colleague collaborate on research. mccabe says in the u.s. business students cheat the most. engineering students are often near the top of the list. and so are communications and journalism students. women studied at one university
to stimulate the economy and keep rates low and that will favor stocks so stocks will take care of what is going on in the treasury market. liz: cap it with the hurricanes and the effect which a reverse from negative to positive at some point. >> you saw jobless claims are up but sandy will handicap it a bit. we will won't see a clean job number until next year. once again it will be at my number and will be waiting for the fed. >> oil coming downn it is simply a story of a lot of supply, less demand. >> that has been the story for the last year. we had plenty of demand, plenty of supply, demand is only deteriorated as we have gone through the year and entering the season without a lot of driving going on. when you take out the fear we have of things going on in syria or iran you see us treating at $78 as opposed to where we are now but -- [talking over each other] liz: when you push it out a couple months to the future of the market and look at the trend -- >> it looks to me like we should be trading $3 or $4 or $6 or $8 lower from here and look for the trend to continue as we go furth
can i do? if they say, what do you think? i say, low income rates, economy recovering slowly, housing coming back, if you stay through the turmoil, you'll have higher markets after its over, and maybe much higher so my view is yoo stay invested, broadly diversified, etfs to do it. >> you had me until much higher markets on the other side. what makes you think that? as an investor, it it's a higher tax, straightforward math. if you raise tax on dividends and capital gains, makes stocks less valuable in the long run, a less appetizing choice. you mentioned housing on the way back. holding assets for a long time, buy housing, gold stocks, something to sit? >> well, you have a diversify, and stocks are under owned, one. the monetary policy is predictable for years, and it's a low, low interest rate so now you say what are the relative choices? go by a high grade tax free bond, 3% interest. i can buy stocks, a 2%-plus dividend, could tax higher, but the dividends rise. i can get into a market cheaply if i believe earnings grow over time, say, the rest of the decade. that's my time horizon.
with some ideas. to your point, you're written quite extensively on this topic. it seems the economy is poised to fall off the cliff and that's what the democrats and the president wants to happen. >> they want to allow all the bush tax cuts to expire. it happens naturally automatically. they don't even have to vote for it. in january we had to lower taxes for everybody. getting it very simply. lori: a lot of people are concerned. if we do go over the cliff, there's no resolution for the alternative minimum taxes, will not be passed that does not get resolved you have 20 million more americans who have to pay this tax otherwise wouldn't and again that could be good leverage for the republicans. how do you see that issue playing out? >> that is a big one because alternative minimum tax largely hits blue states, democratically states like maryland, new jersey, new york, connecticut, california, illinois, all of those are democratic strongholds so they can save the white house were not going to patch it unless you give us something we would like, that gives them a little bit more negot
. horribly inefficient way to grow an economy. >> it's interesting you say that. i feel like one day we're going to back and say, remember whe could borrow at 3% to buy a house. if companies have to borrow the money to pay a dividend, why issue a dividend? >> well, i think we forgot whose money it is. it's the shareholders' money through the company. tax law makes it very difficult to bring the money back in. they've already made the money selling their products and service around the world. so it's much cheaper with low interest rates the way they are to borrow the money and pay the dividends to the shareholders. the tax code actually just represents a very inefficient methodology of transferring the profits to the shareholders as well as influencing where companies are likely to be looking for future profits around the world. >> they've talked in washington periodically about a moratorium on allowing corporations to repatriate some of that money without a tax a consequence. that would help to some degree, wouldn't it? >> absolutely. that would be a very fabulous thing to do. the compa
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)